Welcome to our student resources page! On this page you will find links to complementary websites and other resources that will aid in your historical research and provide inspiration for your own projects.

  • PhilaPlace - Administered by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, this site features user-created content that documents Philadelphia history.
  • Historypin - Historypin.com is a large, international archive featuring user-generated, local historical content. HistoryPin is overseen by the organization We Are What We Do and supported by Google.
  • H-Net - H-Net is an interdisciplinary, scholarly website that features free articles and reviews on a variety of historical topics.
  • TIME - This website of the renowned magazine offers online archives of past issues dating back to the 19200s, including their international publications.
  • LIFE - Drawn from the archives of LIFE magazine, and in partnership with TIME magazine, this website offers a range of historic and modern photo essays. Many include rare photos only published by LIFE magazine.
  • PBS: History - The History page on the PBS website offers video clips, essays, and documentaries on different periods of history divided by time period and/or theme.
  • History Net - This archive is run by the Weider History Group, a large historical magazine publisher. Article topics focus mainly on British and American history, as well as military history.
  • Library of Congress - The Library of Congress website offers a range of primary sources from the Library's archives. The digital archive can be searched by topic or source type. The American Memory section is particularly useful.
  • Awesome Stories - This collection of primary sources is based on topics that have been culled from other online archives. Sources include text, audio, and photos and provide the original source name.
  • History News Network - Provided by George Mason University, this website offers articles written by academics that explore historical events and discuss current events with a historical perspective. The Student Shortcut tab offers more links to primary and secondary sources organized chronologically.
  • Conversations with History - Run by the University of California, Berkeley, this website offers a large video and audio archive of individuals discussing their roles in historical events. The archive dates back to 1982 and is organized chronologically, by topic, and by name.
  • Federal Resources for Educational Excellence - This collection of databases from the federal government allows all of the information collected and provided by federal agencies to be centrally located and searchable. It is frequently updated.
  • ushistory.org - This website, run by the Independence Hall Association in Philadelphia, offers three free online textbooks covering American history, American government, and ancient history as well as links to other helpful websites.
  • Project Gutenberg - This website is the largest collection of free e-books online. There is an overall search function or the catalogue can be browsed by topic.
  • HyperHistory - This website offers a large, clickable timeline of world history as well as maps and biographies. The timeline can be narrowed down by time period, personality, or significant events.
  • National Archives - This website of the National Archives offers official records, photographs, and documents from U.S. history. It is searchable by topic and type of resource and offers a page to help anyone new to online archive research.
  • Digital History - Run by a professor at the University of Houston, this website offers a range of well-categorized and annotated primary and secondary sources.
  • C-SPAN Classroom - This collection of videos are organized by topic and presented by C-Span for teacher and student use. Videos discuss both historical events and current events.